Therapy is a place where one can learn to explore, express, and verbalize feelings and emotions in a safe and confidential setting, while working to effect positive change in the present, and hope for lasting change in the future.


I am a clinical social worker with 10 years of professional experience. It would be my pleasure to work with you or your family member to find solutions to life’s barriers and challenges.


Curious to know if therapy can be helpful? Feel free to contact me.

Whom Do I Work With?


I am most comfortable working with children as young as 8 years old to the young at heart.


Does any of this sound like your child?

  • angry, explosive, oppositional, or defiant
  • difficulty falling asleep
  • experienced a life-changing event
  • academic difficulties, has an IEP
  • “experimenting”
  • sad, emotional, or withdrawn
  • changes in interests or peers
  • consumes too much media
  • shy, difficulties making friends
  • surrounded by “drama”
  • prefer talking to peers than with parents
  • anxious, new fears, nervous
  • going through a transition
  • has a chronic medical condition


If you answered “yes” to any of the above, I would be honored to work with you and/or your child.


 I am certainly not limited by the topics above, therefore contact me with any specific concerns.


Home Stretch

I was once a swimmer who had a coach that thought I would be a great person to swim the 200 butterfly- at every single meet. The 200 fly is not easy- long enough where you can not sprint, but short enough where it’s not a true distance event where you just hold a consistent pace. The strategy was to chop up the event into 3 sections: 50-100-50. Take the first 50 fairly easy, build up your pace during the 100, and pour out whatever you got left to bring it back home for the final 50.

For many students, they are in the 4th quarter, 3rd trimester, or the back half of the 2nd semester. This can also be a stressful time for students and parents, as the pressures to succeed, or simply pass. It can feel like a mad sprint to the end of the year, while others are still trying to get out of cruise control. Here are some tips to make the end of the year as successful as possible. Read the rest of this entry »

Stop Trying to get A’s for Parenting.

There was a time in your schooling that, your aim was to get an A on the quiz, test, class, semester, etc. For some of us, we realized that we could be happy with B’s, or realized that C’s were good enough. There are idealized versions of parenting in the media, that we often wish (or our kids wish) we could emulate, whether it’s trying to live up to the Clair Huxtable, Marge Simpson, Lorelai Gilmore, Carol Brady, or simply trying to be a better parent than your own. The pressures of parenting, and the need to strive for an A in it has never been greater.


There is no shortage of parenting books that offer many tips, ideas, and guidelines to improve your relationship with your child, help them excel at school, promote a more peaceful dinner experience, or to be an A+ parent. These books and its content are awesome, but here’s what I believe to be the most fundamental things parents and families should strive for, and all you have to do is shoot for C’s. Read the rest of this entry »

Things Your Psychiatrist Needs to Know

Have you ever tried to schedule an appointment with a psychiatrist as a new patient for yourself or a loved one? Obtaining an appointment within 4 weeks can almost be like winning the lottery. In many towns, cities, and states, there is a shortage of psychiatrists. If you’re in need of a child psychiatrist, the hunt for an appointment may be even grimmer (the cause, reason, and solution is for another day).


During your first time meeting with the psychiatrist, chances are your doctor will have scheduled to see you for about 40-60 minutes, which during this time she/he will ask various questions related to mental health, medical and family history, as well as current concerns related to the appointment. The psychiatrist will ask very precise questions, listen intently, and make many notes. You will leave the office feeling that you’ve found a warm understanding doctor who will see you through this crisis- that is until the subsequent visit(s).


Little will you realize on your next visit (if lucky it will be within 4 weeks, but probably will be greater than a month) your doctor may be running a few minutes late, will be very matter of fact regarding your medication and how it’s working out, and if all is well you may be surprised your psychiatrist will be whisking you out the door within 15 minutes or less (anything more would be due to a crisis, or pure luxury). The reality is the disproportionate need for psychiatric medication appointments vs. # of psychiatrists in town has many psychiatrists seeing 4-5 patients an hour. Every hour. Every day.


Information That Will Help Your Psychiatrist Determine How to Be of Optimal Help

Read the rest of this entry »